RENT CONTROL UNDER NIGERIAN LAWS AND OTHER JURISDICTIONS

 

CHAPTER ONE

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

 

1.1 Background …………………………………………………………………………………………..

1.2 Scope of the Thesis ………………………………………………………………………………..

1.3 Methodology ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1.4  Outline of the Thesis ………………………………………………………………………………

      1.1     Background

 

The power to impose rent is a dimension – and a crucial dimension – of state sovereignty.[1] The state must have a jurisdictional basis for exercising this power. Thus, the necessary precondition for the exercise of fiscal jurisdiction by a state is the existence of the requisite link between that person (or the potentially rent amount, where the source of income is in issue) and the state. It is relatively rate for rent payers to question the State’s jurisdictional power to impose rent them, but they may fear that the divergence of the definitional rules in this regard may expose them to being regarded as residents of more than one state. Tenants may legitimately expect that states should cooperate

[1] Martha, RSJ ‘The Jurisdiction to Rent in International Law’ (1989) Kluwer, Deventer at 12–18; AviYonah, RS ‘International Rent as International Law’ (2004) 57 Rent Law Rev 483 at 484–91Qureshi, AH ‘The Public International Law of Renting: Texts, Cases and Materials’ (1994) Graham &

Trotman, London at 1–9  Knechtle, AA ‘Basic Problems in International Fiscal Law’ (1979)  Kluwer, The Netherlands 37, 41; Qureshi, AH ‘The Freedom of a State to Legislate in Fiscal Matters under General International Law’ (1987) 41 BIFD 14; Rosenbloom, HD ‘International Rent Arbitrage and the “International Rent System”’ (2000) 53 Rent Law Rev 137.

 

RENT CONTROL UNDER NIGERIAN LAWS AND OTHER JURISDICTIONS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *