MODELING NITRATE  CONCENTRATIONS  IN AN ANTARCTIC  GLACIAL  MELTWATER  STREAM UNDER  FLUCTUATING  HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND NITRATE INPUTSELTWATER STREAM UNDER FLUCTUATING HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND NITRATE INPUTS

  • : Ms Word Format
  • : 100 Pages
  • : ₦3000
  • : 1-5 Chapters
  •  
  • Click to DOWNLOAD Materials

MODELING NITRATE  CONCENTRATIONS  IN AN ANTARCTIC  GLACIAL  MELTWATER  STREAM UNDER  FLUCTUATING  HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND NITRATE INPUTS

ABSTRACT     

 

The         McMurdo        Dry      Valleys            comprise        a          unique            polar    desert             ecosystem         in         Victoria           Land,               Antarctica.      The      hydrologic      system            in    the       Dry      Valleys            is          often    characterized             as         being               simplified        compared          to         temperate       watersheds,    due      to         the       ability             to         identify    physical          boundaries     and      nutrient          sources           and      sinks.               We       seek     to    characterize    the       evolution        of         streamflow,    solutes,           and      nutrients         along    a          glacial              meltwater       stream            in         the       McMurdo        Dry      Valleys,           and         to         understand    the       role     of         different         sources           and      sinks    under    varying           hydrologic      conditions.      The      study               presented       here    includes          streamflow        routing,           solute              modeling,        and      nitrate             concentration            modeling           in         Von     Guerard          stream,            a          stream            with     abundant        algal       coverage         in         the       McMurdo        Dry      Valleys            region             of         Antarctica.         The      streamflow     model              is          a          solution          to         the       kinematic    wave    routing            problem.         Solute              modeling        addresses       advection,       dispersion,        as         well     as         hyporheic       zone    inputs,             which              are       controlled    by        weathering     and      hyporheic       exchange.       Lastly,             the       nitrate             model    builds              on        the       solute              model              with     the       addition          of         a          gross      primary          production     (GPP)              component.    Results            indicate           that      the    hyporheic       source             of         nitrate             is          controlling      due      to         rapid    exchange    with     the       main    channel.          GPP     impacts           are       small    due      to         light-­‐saturated    conditions      for       a          majority          of         the       season,            but       provide           a          consistent          sink     for       nitrate.            The      role     of         advective        and      dispersive       transport           is          highly              dependent      on        flow     conditions,      with     advective        transport           controlling      at         high     flows    and      dispersive       controlling      at         low      flows.

 

 

  • TABLE    OF        CONTENTS     

 

LIST       OF        FIGURES         ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..            vi

LIST       OF        TABLES          …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….             viii               ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS       ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….           ix

Chapter              1          Introduction               …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….    1

  • Study    Area            3
    • The    Hydrologic     System                     4
  • Importance    of         Hyporheic      Interaction              5
  • Nitrate    Sources           in         Dry      Valley              Streams                   6
  • Nitrogen    Transformation         in         Dry      Valley              Streams                   6
    • Evidence    for       Hyporheic      Influence        on        Nitrate                     9
  • Evidence    for       Autotrophic    Controls          on        Nitrate                     9
  • Scope    &          Objectives                10

Chapter              2          Experimental             Design             and      Data    Collection       ……………………………………………………..              12

  • Experimental    Design                      12
  • Data    &          Instrumentation                 13
    • Water    Level/Stage             13
    • Downstream    Stage             14
    • Electrical    Conductivity                        15
    • Meteorological    Data             15
  • Nitrate    Concentrations                   16
  • Campbell    Datalogger              17

Chapter              3          Methods         …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………    18

3.1                                                                                                                    Streamflow              Routing                             18

3.1.1                                                                                       Numerical              Methods                                    -­‐                                                                                                FTBS                       19

  • Conceptual    Model              of         Hyporheic      Role              20
  • Electrical    Conductivity               Modeling                 21
    • Numerical    Methods         –          FTCS             21
    • FTCS    and      Numerical       Dispersion               22
    • Hyporheic    Discharge                22

3.4                                                                                                                            Nitrate              Modeling                          24

3.4.1                                                                                               Calculating              GPP                              24

Chapter              4          Results            ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………    26

  • Flow    Routing                    26
  • EC    Modeling                 27
    • Constant    Fraction          Discharge                28
    • Exponential    Function         Discharge                28
  • GPP    Model                       30
  • Nitrate    Modeling                 32

4.4.1                                                                                Relative              Contributions                        to                                                                      Concentration                       35

Chapter              5          Discussion      ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..        37

  • Streamflow             37
  • Conductivity             37
  • Nitrate             38

5.3.1                                                                            Hyporheic              Versus                                       Autotrophic                                                                       Controls                       38

Chapter              6          Conclusions    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..          40    References     ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….               42        Appendix           A          Flow    Duration         Curve              and      Flow    Dates               ………………………………………………………….          45

Appendix           B          List      of         Equations……………………………………………………………………………………………….               47

Chapter           1        

Introduction             

The        McMurdo        Dry      Valleys            present           a          unique            environment               for       studying          both

hydrologic         and      biotic               processes       due      to         the       lack      of         macrophytes    or        stream            macroinvertebrates,             lack      of         detritus           inputs,             and      presence           of         24-­‐hour        daylight           during             the       flow     season.            In         addition,            permafrost     limits               the       depth              of         subsurface     exchange.       Due        to         the       high     aridity             and      extremely       low      precipitation,              liquid    water              is          available         in         limited             amounts         and      comes             solely    from    glacial              meltwater,      eliminating     the       potential         for       regional          groundwater    contributions.            The      lack      of         the       aforementioned         sources           and         sinks    found              in         most    temperate       streams           make    this      simplified        ecosystem         an        ideal    location           for       studying          the       impact             of         hyporheic    exchange        on        nitrogen          processing      because          processes       are       more    identifiable.       Despite           the       extreme          climate,           biota    (benthic          algae    and      mosses)             thrive              in         Dry      Valley              streams           during             the       Austral    summer,         and      their    existence        has      important       implications    for       nutrient          concentrations.             The      ability              to         model              downstream               nutrient          concentrations             also     has      important       implications    for       Dry      Valley              lakes,    especially        in         the       Lake    Fryxell            basin    (Figure            1-­‐1),              where             streams             contribute      a          majority          of         the       water,              solutes,           and      nutrients           the       Lake.

Nutrient             studies            conducted      in         McMurdo        Dry      Valley              streams               can      provide

insight    into      processes       occurring        in         many               headwater      streams,          in         the    sense               that      they     provide           complexities               not       present           in         laboratory    experiments,              but       with     a          stripped          down               landscape.      In-­‐stream     processing        of         inorganic        nitrogen          by        means             of         nitrification,    denitrification,              sorption,         and      uptake             has      been    found              to         play     a    significant       role     in         determining    export             of         NH4+    and      NO3-­‐               from    small      watersheds    (Peterson       et         al.,        2001).             Due     to         the       high     rates    of    nitrogen          transformation          and      removal          in         headwater      streams           from    elevated             biological        activity            and      sediment-­‐water       contact

time        (Peterson       et         al.,        2001),             the       role     played             by        these    streams    in         processing      nitrate             and      other    forms              of         organic           and      labile    nitrogen          is          vital.    In         many               temperate       headwater      streams,          the       roles      played             by        different         sources           and      sinks    are       difficult           to         identify.             Many               temperate       watersheds    suffer              from    high     nitrate             concentrations,             due      in         large    part     to         anthropogenic           inputs,             such    as    agricultural    runoff             and      atmospheric               deposition.     Specifically,     47%    of         streams             assessed         in         the       U.S.      in         2004    were    either              impaired         or    threatened,    with     nutrients         being               the       fifth     highest            cause               of         impairment       (U.S.     Environmental           Protection      Agency,           2009).             Therefore,      it    is          important       to         understand    how     and      where             these    processes       occur    in         the       stream            environment,             and

what       determines     the       rates    at         which              processing      occurs.

Previous            studies            have    laid      the       foundation     for       understanding           how       nutrients

are          processed       in         Dry      Valley              streams,          but       we       believe            our      methods            can      improve          our

understanding              in         the       following        ways:

  1. Continuous,    in-­‐situ           records           of         nitrate             concentrations           as         collected           for       this      study               throughout     the       season,            help     characterize     seasonal         dynamics        under              the

widely               varying           conditions      seen    in         the       Dry      Valleys.

  1. Continuous    measurements           also     provide           an        opportunity    for       modeling              nutrient          concentrations           under              diel      fluctuations    in         hydrologic              and      nutrient          conditions,      over    multiple             These              fluctuations      are       an        important

signature          of         hydrology       in         the       region.

  1. We    are       able     to         gain     an        understanding           of         contributions             to              nutrient          processes       without           adding             nutrients         to         the                     Nutrient          addition          experiments               intentionally               elevate              concentrations           to         levels               outside            of         the       normal            range.    Biota    may     respond          to         the       increased        stimuli             by        altering              uptake             rates    (Thouin          et.        al.,        2009),             potentially      leading              to         erroneous      conclusions    about              ambient          nutrient          processing.

2.1 Study           Area   

The        McMurdo        Dry      Valleys            comprise        the       largest             ice-­‐free         area       on        the       Antarctic

continent.          Taylor             Valley,             the       site      of         the       present           study,              as    well     as         many               long-­‐term     studies            in         the       region,            spans              about     33km               east     to         west    between          McMurdo        Sound             at

Explorers’         Cove    and      Taylor            Glacier            on        the       western          edge    of         Lake       Bonney,          as         seen    in         Figure             1-­‐1.    Between         1987    and      2000,    the       Lake    Fryxell            basin    experienced    an        average           mean               annual             temperature     of         -­‐20°C,            with     a          maximum       recorded        temperature               of    9°C

and         minimum        of         -­‐60°C            (Doran            et.        al.,        2002).             Less     than     10    cm       of         precipitation              falls     annually,         all        in         the       form    of         snow,   and      mostly             during             the       austral            winter             (Doran            et.        al.,        2002).

 

[Figure              1-­‐1]              A          site      map     showing          the       extent              of         Taylor    Valley,             including         Von     Guerard

Stream,              the       location           of         the       present           study.              The      Valley              is    bordered        by        the       Asgard

Range     to         the       north,              McMurdo        Sound             to         the       east,     Kukri               hills        to         the       south,              and      Taylor

Glacier    to         the       west.    Lake    Fryxell            is          the       easternmost    lake     shown             above.

2.1.1 The            Hydrologic      System

Despite              such    extreme          conditions,      ephemeral      streams           flow     for       4-­‐12          weeks

during    the       austral            summer          (depending     both    on        the       stream,            and      weather             conditions)     through          permanent     channels         into      the       valley’s            3    endorheic       lakes.               Thirteen         of         the       streams           have    streamflow     gauges    that      are      currently        monitored      by        the       McMurdo        Dry      Valleys            Long    Term      Ecological       Research        (MCM-­‐LTER)           group.             Major              ion,      nutrient,    and      dissolved        organic           carbon            samples          are       collected         by        team    members           approximately           weekly            throughout     the       flow     season            to         be    analyzed         in         the       lab.      Cyanobacteria            mats,    consisting       largely             of         Phormidium      and      Nostoc             communities              (Howard-­‐Williams              &          Vincent,    1989),             exist    in         varying           abundances    throughout     the       Valley,             surviving    the       austral            winter             in         a          “freeze-­‐dried”          state    (Howard-­‐Williams    C.         ,            Vincent,           Broady,           &

Vincent,              1986    and     McKnight        et.        al.,        1999).

Data       was      collected         for       the       present           study               in         Von     Guerard               Stream            in         the       Lake

Fryxell    basin,              one      of         the       three    major              closed-­‐basin            lake     systems    in         Taylor             Valley.             Von     Guerard          is          considered     to         be        a          long        stream,            and      has      abundant        algal    mats    for       much               of         is          approximately              5-­‐kilometer              length.             Von     Guerard          Stream            flows    into        Lake    Fryxell’s          southeast        corner,            with     a          median            discharge        of    3.3       L/s.      The      average           flow     season            for       Von     Guerard          Stream            starts     on        December       16        and      ends    on        January           30.       Refer   to

Appendix           A          for       flow     duration         curves             of         Von     Guerard          and      other      long     streams,          as         well     as         a          chart    of         average           flow     dates    for    all        gauged            streams.

2.2 Importance            of         Hyporheic      Interaction    

Sophocleous     (2002)            describes        exchange        between          stream            water               and      the

hyporheic          zone    as         “the     key      to         evaluating       the       ecological       structure        of    stream            systems           and      their    management”.            The      nature             of         hyporheic    flowpaths       is          that      exchange        occurs             rapidly,           and      water              may     exchange           between          the       stream            and      hyporheic       zone    several            times    along               a          single              reach,              making            the       biogeochemical          signature    of         hyporheic       water              an        important       factor              in         stream            water    quality             (Harvey          &          Wagner,          2000).

There     is          very     limited             transport        of         solutes            and      nutrients         to           streams           from    the

surrounding      landscape       due      to         the       limited             availability      of         liquid               water     in         the       Dry      Valleys.           Melt     water              from    Taylor             Valley              frozen-­‐based              glaciers           is          also     a          poor    source             of         weatherable    minerals,           and      as         a          result              water-­‐rock               interaction      in         the       hyporheic          zone    is          a          primary          source             of         certain            cations            (Nezat    et.        al.,        2001).             The      hyporheic       zone    has      been    found              to         be    an        important       source             of         ions     that      are       not       abundant        in         marine    aerosols,         such    as         Si         and      K,         as         a          result              of         weathering     of    silicate             materials        (Gooseff          et.        al.,        2002).             Maurice          et.        al.         (2002)    observed        mineral           precipitates    and      etch     pits      on        muscovite       mica    that        was      buried             in         Green              Creek,              and      attributed       these    features    to         chemical         weathering     processes       in         the       hyporheic       zone.    Nezat               et.    al.         (2001)            and      Gooseff           et.        al.         (2002)            both    identified        stream    discharge        as         a          primary          control            on       chemical         weathering     rates.    We       propose          that      the       hyporheic       zone    may     also     be        an        important       source    of         other    solutes            and      nutrients,        such    as         nitrate.

2.3 Nitrate        Sources          in         Dry      Valley             Streams         

When     compared       with     other    flowing            waters             of         the       world,             nitrate

concentrations              in         Dry      Valley              streams           have    been    found              to         be    considerably              low      (Green,            et         al.,        1989).             Due     to         the       absence    of         overland         flow     and      regional          groundwater              influence,        much               of    the       dissolved        inorganic        nitrogen          (DIN)               occurring        in         dry      valley    streams           comes             from    wet-­‐deposited         nitrate             on        glacier             surfaces    and      in         streambeds    (Witherow,     et         al.,        2006).             Only     a          small    amount    of         nitrogen          is          available         in         stream            sediments       (Howard-­‐Williams,    Priscu,             &          Vincent,          1989).             The      lack      of         N          sources           during    the       flow     season            means             that      the       highest            concentrations           are       often      during             first     flows    and      at         low      flow     (Howard-­‐Williams,              Priscu,    &          Vincent,           1989).

2.4 Nitrogen     Transformation         in         Dry      Valley             Streams         

Several        studies            have    previously      addressed      nutrient          dynamics        in         Dry    Valley              streams.          Early    studies            focused           on        periodically    collecting        water     samples          throughout     the       flow     season,            sometimes      at         several            locations            along               a          stream            reach,              at         ambient          conditions.      One         such    study               found              that      inorganic        and      labile               organic           nitrogen             sources           are       removed         by        stream            biota,               and      that      uptake    lengths            are       comparable    to         temperate       stream            environments            (Howard-­‐Williams,     Priscu,             &          Vincent,           1989).             An        analysis           of         water     samples          taken               along               a          stream            reach,              coupled           with        a          model              of         primary

productivity      in         Canada            Stream            confirmed       that      microbial        communities    transform       inorganic        nitrogen          and      urea    (Moorhead,    McKnight,       &          Tate,    1998).    A          water              quality             study               on        the       Onyx    River    in         Wright    Valley              did       not       find      significantly    different         concentrations           of         ammonium,       dissolved        reactive           phosphorus    (DRP),             or        nitrate

entering             Lake    Vanda             at         different         discharges,     but       did       find      lower    nitrate             concentrations           downstream               of         reaches           with     visible             microbial           activity,           such    as         the       Boulder          Pavement       (Howard-­‐Williams,    Hawes,            Schwarz,         &          Hall,     1997).             Figure             1-­‐2    shows             a          map        of         the       Onyx    River    study               reach.              The      Boulder          Pavement       was        earlier             identified        as         an        area     of         active              nutrient          transformation             (Howard-­‐Williams              C.         ,

Vincent,              Broady,           &          Vincent,           1986).

 

[Figure              1-­‐2]                          The      Onyx    River    is          located            in         Wright            Valley,    which              is          adjacent          to         Taylor             Valley              to         the       north.    An        early    study               characterized             how     nutrient          concentrations           changed    along               the       River.              Lake    Vanda             and      the       Boulder          Pavement       are    indicated.       Figure             from    Howard-­‐Williams    et.        al.         (1997).

More           recent             studies            have    been    conducted      using    stream            tracer    experiments               to         understand    uptake             processes.      McKnight        et         al.         (2004)    conducted      a          nutrient          addition          experiment     in         Green              Creek    in         order              to         characterize    nitrate             and      phosphate      transformation          processes          along               a          reach,              attributing      nitrate             losses              to         denitrification               in         the       hyporheic       zone.    Gooseff           et         al.         (2004)            considered        nutrient          additions,        microbial        mat      assays,            and      transient         storage              modeling        to         focus    more    specifically      on        the       role     of         the       hyporheic          zone    in         nutrient          processing,     and      found              that      biotic               assimilation       and      mat      transient         storage           were    important       nitrate             sinks.    Most    recently,          Koch    et         al.         (2010)            conducted      a          nitrate             enrichment        experiment     in         Huey    Creek,              and      found              that      reactivity        of    nitrogen          species            may     be        primarily        controlled       by        exchange        between    surface            water              and      hyporheic       sediments.

2.4.1 Evidence    for       Hyporheic       Influence         on        Nitrate

Previous            nutrient          studies            in         Taylor             Valley              streams,          as    well     as         some    temperate       stream            studies,           have    attributed       nutrient          transformation             processes       to

cycling    in         the       hyporheic       zone.    Nitrate            losses              in         the       return             flow        of         a          tracer              experiment     in         Huey    Creek              were    attributed       to    increased        nitrate             reduction        in         the       hyporheic       zone    of         the       anabranching    reach               (Koch              et.        al.,        2010).             Nitrate            reduction        by    means             of         denitrification            in         the       hyporheic       zone    was      also     identified    during             a          tracer              injection          and      transient         storage           analysis           in    Green              Creek              (Gooseff          et.        al.,        2004),             which              is          corroborated    by        the       earlier             identification              of         nitrate-­‐reducing      bacteria    in         hyporheic       sediments       (Maurice         et.        al.,        2002).             Hyporheic      nitrate    uptake             in         Green              Creek              was      estimated        to         be        between          7    and      16%,    depending      on        the       reach               (McKnight

  1. al.,        2004).

2.5 Evidence     for       Autotrophic               Controls         on        Nitrate           

Many      recent             studies            in         temperate       streams           have    attempted       to    isolate             the       impacts           that      primary          producers      have    on        stream            nitrate,               and     found              that      uptake             rates    were    higher             when               GPP        was      higher             (Hall    and      Tank    2003,               Mulholland     et.        al.,        2006,

Hoellein             et.        al.,        2007,               Roberts           and      Mulholland     2007,               Heffernan    and      Cohen             2010).             Some               studies            found              that      community     respiration        explained        less      of         the       variation         in         nitrate             uptake             than       did       primary          productivity    (Hall    and      Tank    2003,               Roberts           and      Mulholland        2007),             and      several            found              correlations    between          stream    temperature               and      uptake             (Mulholland    et         al         2006,               Heffernan       and         Cohen             2010).             Nitrate            concentrations

had         varying           impacts           on        uptake,            from    none    at         all        (Hoellein         et.    al.,        2007)              to         having             a          primary          influence         (Thouin          et.        al.,    2009).             Persistent       illumination    during             the       austral            summer          necessitates      the

development     of         alternative      methods         for       studying          primary          production     processes          in         Antarctic         streams,          as         methods         in         all        of         the       above     studies            relied              on        the       principle         that      autotrophic    activity            ceases    during             nighttime        hours.             We       propose          that      autotrophic    uptake    may     control            nitrate             concentrations           in         Dry      Valley              streams,          especially          under              low-­‐flow       conditions.

2.6 Scope          &         Objectives    

The           scope              of         the       proposed        work    is          to         create              and      explore              a          model              for       nitrate             concentrations           in         single-­‐source    glacial              meltwater       streams,          in         the       Dry      Valleys            of         Antarctica,      that         accounts         for       variable          flow     and      sources           and      sinks    of         nitrate    along               a          reach.              The      model              will      consider         both    physical          and         biological        controls          on        nitrate             concentrations           in         the       main    channel              and      the       hyporheic       zone,    including         advection,       dispersion,     net       hyporheic/respiration             effects,            and      autotrophic    activity.           The      model              was         informed        and      evaluated        mainly             by        data     collected         during             the    2011-­‐2012               austral            summer          in         Von     Guerard          Stream,           but       also        by        values             reported         from    previous         studies            in         the       McMurdo    Dry      Valleys.           The      role     of         the       hyporheic       zone    will      be        evaluated        by    using    a          model              for       electrical         conductivity,               which              was      developed    for       use      in         the       present           study.              More    specifically,     we       propose          two         potential         controls          on        nitrate             concentrations           in         dry      valley    streams           and      seek     to         quantify          their    contributions             under

fluctuating         discharge        and      meltwater       concentrations:

  1. We    propose          that      nitrate             uptake             is          positively        associated      with        gross    primary          production     (GPP)              (assimilatory              uptake             by           benthic            algae),             which              depends          on        photosynthetically     active     radiation         (PAR).
  2. Nitrate    is          controlled      by        processes       occurring        in         the       hyporheic          zone,    which

depend        on        discharge.       This     could               include:

  1. Regeneration    through          nitrification
  2. Mineralization
  3. Ecosystem    respiration
  4. Denitrification

MODELING NITRATE  CONCENTRATIONS  IN AN ANTARCTIC  GLACIAL  MELTWATER  STREAM UNDER  FLUCTUATING  HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND NITRATE INPUTS

Leave a Reply