A  TIME-­RESOLVED SYNCHROTRON X-­RAY  DIFFRACTION STUDY OF  THE IN SITU, HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS OF GOETHITE FROM 2-­‐LINE FERRIHYDRITE 

  • : Ms Word Format
  • : 100 Pages
  • : ₦3000
  • : 1-5 Chapters
  •  
  • Click to DOWNLOAD Materials

A  TIME-­RESOLVED SYNCHROTRON X-­RAY  DIFFRACTION STUDY OF  THE IN SITU, HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS OF GOETHITE FROM 2-­‐LINE FERRIHYDRITE

Abstract

              

The        hydrothermal            transformation          of         2-­‐line            ferrihydrite    to         goethite             at         pH       13.6

was         studied            at         80,       90,       and      100      °C         using    time-­‐resolved,         angle-­‐dispersive         X-­‐ray             diffraction      at         the       Advanced       Photon            Source,            Argonne            National          Lab.                 We       found              that      these    in         situ      experiments      could               be        successfully    performed      by        injecting          freshly            made      ferrihydrite    gels

into         polyimide       capillaries       that      were    then     sealed             with     fast      curing             epoxy.                The      integrity          of         these    reaction          cells     held     steady             when    heated             to         100      °C         for       up        to         6          hr,        and      the       low

background       scattering       from    the       polyimide       allowed           for       an        extremely       high        sensitivity       for       the       detection        of         weak    X-­‐ray             diffraction      peaks    from    the       first     goethite          nanocrystals              to

nucleate.

Rietveld              analysis           of         the       time-­‐resolved          series              of         X-­‐ray          diffraction      patterns          as

goethite             crystallized     enabled           a          high-­‐resolution       extraction       of         crystallographic           and

kinetic    data.                Particle           sizes    for       goethite          increased        with     time     at         similar    rates    for       all        three    temperatures,            from    particle           diameters       of         ≈135      Å          for       the       first     crystals           detected          to         ≈290    Å          after    6          hr.                With    increasing       particle           size,     unit-­‐cell        volume            decreased,      primarily    as         a          result              of         a          contraction     along               the       c-­‐axis,           the       direction            of         closest-­‐packing        (S.G.     Pnma).                        At         100      °C         c           decreased         from    4.631               ±          0.001               to         4.613               ±          0.001               Å.                We       found              no        evidence         for

high        vacancy           concentrations           in         incipient          goethite          nanocrystals,              in    contrast          to         our      prior

study      of         hematite         crystallization            (Peterson,       et         al.         2015).

Two       different         kinetic             models            were    used    to         calculate         the       activation          energy            of         the

reaction:            a          pseudo            first-­‐order    model              based              on        the       Johnson-­‐Mehl-­‐Avrami-­‐Kolmogorov             (JMAK)            equation,        and      a          linear              Arrhenius    analysis           based              on        only     the       initial               reaction          rates.                           Both       approaches    yielded            excellent         fits       to         the       data     (R2       >          0.95),    but       the       calculated       activation        energies          using    the       JMAK               and      linear    models            were    72.74               and      100.1               kJ/mol,            respectively.                           This        disparity         reveals            that      the       transformation          of         ferrihydrite    to         goethite             was      most    temperature-­‐dependent    during             the       initial               stages    of         crystallization.

 

 

              

TABLE     OF       CONTENTS

 

 

List         of         tables……………………………………………………………………………………………..vi

List         of         figures…………………………………………………………………………………………..vii

Acknowledgements……………………………………………………………………………………..x

 

Chapter             1.         INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………..1

Hydrothermal               Experiments               and    X-­‐ray                                      Diffraction……………………………..1

Rationale           for       Present           Study…………………………………………………………………………..6

 

Chapter             2.         EXPERIMENTAL        METHODS…………………………………………………………………13

Sample               Preparation………………………………………………………………………………………13

Construction     of         Environmental           Cell………………………………………………………….13

Synchrotron     X-­‐ray             Diffraction…………………………………………………………………….16                      Structure           Refinement……………………………………………………………………………………18

Particle              Size      Determination………………………………………………………………………..19

Kinetic               Modeling……………………………………………………………………………………………19

 

Chapter              3.         RESULTS…………………………………………………………………………………………………..28                     Changes             in         Particle           Size……………………………………………………………………………….28

Crystal               Structure        Changes          During    Goethite                                  Crystallization…………………28

Kinetics              of         Goethite          Crystallization…………………………………………………………..29

 

Chapter             4.         DISCUSSION……………………………………………………………………………………………..40

Kinetic               Modeling……………………………………………………………………………………………40

Crystallographic           Parameters………………………………………………………………………41

 

Chapter             5.         CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………………………………………..42

Introduction

Hydrothermal              Experiments              and      X-­‐ray            Diffraction

Crystallographers        attempted       to         study               the       effect               of         temperature               and      pressure         on

crystal    structure        almost             immediately               after    X-­‐ray             diffraction      (XRD)    was      first     applied            to        the       determination            of         atomic             positions         in    minerals.         For      example,         within              a          year     of         solving            the       structure    of         sodium            chloride,         W.H.    Bragg              conducted      experiments               on        the    thermal           expansion       of         halite               (Bragg,            1914).                         However,        Bragg’s              method           allowed           for       only     a          single              crystal             to         be    studied            in         a          few      crystallographic         orientations,               severely          limiting    the       statistical       rigor    of         the       data     collected.                    In         contrast,         Albert    Hull     (1917)            recognized     that      X-­ray              diffraction      of         powders         enabled    the       sampling         of         a          large    number           of         crystals           in         many               orientations.                 Powder           XRD     was      advantageous            because          it          required    only     a          small    amount           of         material          (as       little     as         0.005               g)         and         extreme          purity              of         monophasic    powders         was      not

necessary,         allowing          whole              rocks               or        soils     to         be        studied            in    bulk     (Hull,               1917).

Thermal            diffraction      of         dry      powders         became           conventional              by        the         1920s,             but       X-­‐ray

diffraction         of         solid-­‐fluid     mixtures         proved            a          continuing      challenge.                      Hydrothermal            experiments               required         the       sample            to         be        completely        contained       during             heating            in         order              to         prevent           water     vapor              loss.                 However,        in         early    approaches    to         XRD,    “angle-­‐dispersive”        powder           diffraction      (ADPD)           was      the       only     viable              methodology.                As        with     the       original           experiments               by        W.L.     and      W.H.       Bragg,             in         ADPD,             the       diffraction      angle    θ          is          varied             as    a          monochromatic         beam               of         X-­‐rays           (of       wavelength     λ)         samples    a          range              of         lattice              planes             of         interplanar     spacing           dhkl,      and         constructive    interference    of         the       diffracted        beams             is

expressed          by        Bragg’s           law:                 λ          =          2dhkl    sin       θ          (Clark,             1989).                            In         the       traditional      Bragg-­Brentano       geometry,       the       X-­‐ray    source             is          spatially          fixed    but       the       sample            and      the       detector          are    rotated,           greatly            limiting            the       varieties          of         sample            cell       that      are    compatible     with

hydrothermal    experiments.

Energy              Dispersive     Approaches.             Giessen           and      Gordon           (1968)               innovated       a          new

technique          that      did       not       require           either              sample            or        detector          rotation:            Energy            Dispersive      Powder           Diffraction      (EDPD).                       Not      only        did       EDPD              allow    for       the       sample            to         remain            still,      it          also        cut       down               on        the       capture           time.                Because          the       incident    beam               is          polychromatic,           λ          rather             than     θ          is          the       variable    in         Bragg’s           law,      and      intensities       from    Bragg              peaks              for       all        d-­spacings           are       collected         simultaneously.                      Using               a          Siemens          X-­‐ray         source             with     an        Fe        anode              at         8          ma       and      45        kV        and         a          lithium-­‐drifted         Si         semiconductor           detector,         Giessen           and      Gordon

(1968)    obtained         indexable        diffraction      patterns          within              15        seconds.          Even       today               a          standard         diffractometer           with     Bragg-­‐Brentano      geometry    requires          at         least    10        minutes           to

collect    an        indexable        pattern.

The        advent             of         EDPD              opened           up        a          wealth             of         directions          to         pursue            with     respect            to

in            situ      XRD     experiments               for       hydrothermal            systems.                      In         the    1980s,             Paul     Barnes            and      colleagues      at         the       Daresbury      Synchrotron    Radiation           Source            (SRS)               took     advantage       of         the       high     intensity          of    synchrotron    X-­‐ray             radiation,        which              allowed           for       short    capture           times      and      data     collection        from    encapsulated              samples.                      The      high     penetration       of         the       synchrotron    X-­‐rays           enabled           samples          to         be        encased             by        materials,        such    as         steel,    that      would              normally         absorb    most    of         the       incident           X-­‐ray             beam               from    standard         diffractometers    (Clark,             1988).                         Barnes            pioneered       his       method           at         Station    9.7       of         the       5          Tesla    Wiggler

magnet               beamline         of         SRS      throughout     the       late      1980s              and      1990s.

By           1991,               Barnes            et         al.         had      developed      three    different         environmental              cell       designs,           1)         a          flat       plate    in         reflection;       2)         a    thin      plate    in         transmission;             and      3)         a          reaction          tube     in         transmission.                Each    cell       was      developed      for       certain            types    of         experiments      and      exhibited

both       advantages     and      disadvantages.

  • The    flat       plate    in         reflection        (Figure            1a)       is          best     used    for               experiments               where             the       sample            does    not       permit               sufficient         X-­‐ray             penetration    for       the       transmission              cells,       or        if          the       reactions        studied            are       in         a          controlled               gas                                The      flat       plate    in         reflection        can               be        used    with     or        without

heating.

  • The    thin      plate    in         transmission              (Figure            1b)      is          used    with        a          heating            plate    that      has      a          central            aperture         that        allows             an        exit      path     for       the       diffracted

radiation           from    the       sample.

  • The    reaction          tube     in         transmission              (Figure            1c)       is          the               most    versatile          cell       and      can      be        used    for       studying          bulk        reactions        under              a          variety            of         both    solid    state    and         hydrothermal                              The      original           reaction          tube       was      a          sealable          sample            container,       similar             in         size         to         a          laboratory      test      tube,    surrounded    by        a          block    containing         coils     for       circulating      fluid     allowing          the

heating              or        cooling            of         the       system.                                    Barnes               was      able     to         collect             EDPD              patterns          for       a          variety               of         processes       using    these    cells,    including         the       hydration               of         cements,         the       synthesis        of         ceramics,        and      the       crystallization               of

ferromagnetic               metallic           glasses            (reviewed       in         Barnes,           1991).

In            1995,               Evans              et         al.         developed      a          more    advanced        version               of         Barnes’           reaction          tube

in            transmission              (Figure            2).                    The      sample            holder             in         this         cell       was      a          stainless-­‐steel          tube     closed            at         one      end.                 The        wall     of         the       tube     was      machined        down               to         a          thickness        of    0.7       mm      over    a          29        mm      height              range              to         allow    the       incident    and      diffracted        beams             to         penetrate        the       sample.                       In         order    to         prevent           contact            between          reagents         and      the       metal               cell       walls,      a          Teflon             liner    and      lid        were    created           to         fit         within              the    steel    tube.                This     cell      was      attached          to         a          Parr     Instruments    bomb    cover               fitted    with     a          flat       Teflon             gasket.             Connected      to         the       bomb     cover               was      a          gauge              block    assembly,        with     both    a          pressure    relief    valve    (set      to         450      psi)      and      an        Inconel            rupture           disk     rated    to    1002    psi.                   A          blast    containment               chamber         connected       to         the       burst      disk     and      surrounded    the       bomb              itself.                A          digital              pressure    gauge              was      also     fitted    to         the       gauge              block    via       a          pressure         transducer.                   This     design             allowed           for       a          working          pressure         and         temperature               of         400      psi       and      230°C              respectively    (Evans             et    al.,        1995).                         To        this      day,     many               studies            continue         to         use    this      experimental              cell       design             (e.g.     Shaw    et         al.         2005;              Sun

and         Ren,     2013).

EDPD,    however,        offers              serious            drawbacks.                 The      main    disadvantage               of         EDPD              is          its

low         peak    resolution       compared       to         that      of         ADPD.                         EDPD’s            momentum       resolution       is          an        order              of         magnitude      worse             than     that        of         ADPD.                         This     makes             EDPD              unsuitable      for       studying    low-­‐symmetry         materials,        which              typically          are       characterized             by        overlapping      XRD     peaks.                          More    significantly,               it          is          not       possible    to         obtain             full       crystal             structure        refinements    from    EDPD              patterns    because          of         the       complex          relationship    between          X-­‐ray             energy            and         sample            absorption.                 Thus,    EDPD              is          most    appropriate    for       crystals              that      have    an        established     crystal             structure.                    The      detector    and      counting         chain    also     limit     EDPD’s            count               rate     to         about

5             x          104      counts/s         (Clark,             1988).                        Comparisons              of         EDPD     and      ADPD              spectra            can      be        seen    in         Figures           3a        and      3b.

Constant           Wavelength              Techniques.             For      the       reason            outlined             above,             ADPD

remains             the       best     option             for       accurate          refinement     of         crystal             structures.                     Throughout    the       mid-­‐1990s,               multiple          cells     were    developed    for       compatibility              with     in         situ      ADPD.                         In         1994,               Notten    et         al.         innovated       a          high-­‐pressure          cell       to         investigate      hydride           formation          reactions        (Figure            4).                    The      cell       consisted        of         a          stainless-­‐steel             cylindrical       housing           such    that      180°    of         the       cylinder          wall        was      left       open    and,     in         places,             a          curved            X-­‐ray             transparent       Be        window           with     a          thickness        of         0.3       mm      was      placed.                This     curved            window           allowed           the       cell       to         rotate              while    still      enabling          the       X-­‐rays           to         reach               the       sample.                                   This        experimental              cell       was      used    to         determine       the       absorption     and      desorption        kinetics           of         hydrogen        to         LaNi5               (Notten           et         al.,

1994).

All           of         the       EDPD              and      the       Notten             ADPD              experimental     cells     are       complicated    to

assemble           and      require           expensive       parts.                           In         1996,               Poul     Norby,    who     was      a          postdoctoral              researcher     at         Brookhaven    National          Laboratory,       developed      an        environmental           cell       that

was         easy     to         put       together,         versatile          over    a          range              of         experiments      and      compatible     with     ADPD              for       powder-­‐fluid-­‐gas              mixtures.                He        contained       the       sample            assemblages               in         0.5-­‐0.7          mm      quartz    capillaries,      mounted         using    a          ferrule            in         a          T-­‐connector,            which,    in         turn     was      mounted         on        a          goniometer    head    (Figure            5).           The      capillaries       were    sealed             on        one      end      and      gas       was      pumped          into        the       other    end      to         apply               a          pressure         sufficient         to         contain    the       sample.                       A          hot       air        gun      heated             the       sample            externally.                Norby             used    two      different         air        guns    depending      on        the       desired    temperatures;            for       temperatures             up        to         250°C,             he        employed       a    heating            coil      in         an        insulated         glass    tube,    but       for       higher             temperature     experiments               (up      to         900°C)            he        exploited        a          commercial       Enraf               Nonius            heater.                        The      full       schematic       with     gas    flow     and      heater             can      be        seen    in         Figure             6.                     Norby             performed        all        experiments               at         the

National             Synchrotron    Light    Source            (NSLS)            at         Brookhaven    National          Laboratory       (BNL)              on

the          Chemistry       Beamline,        X7B.

Rationale          for       the       Present           Study

For         this                                                                                                                                        study,       I           sought                                                                                                                                         to       accomplish                                                                                                                               two       goals.                                                                                                                                                                First,    I                                                                                                                                       attempted       to         modify                                                                                                                                       the

Norby-­‐type     environmental           cell       to         achieve           the       following        targets:

  • A    decrease         in         the       X-­‐ray             background    contribution               from       the       capsule           relative           to         the       quartz             glass    used    in               standard         capillary          containers;
  • Minimization    of         the       time     between          sample            loading            and      X-­‐ray         data     collection;       and
  • Compatibility with     fluid-­‐powder           mixtures         at         temperatures             at               least    as         high

as           100      °C

Secondly,          I           aimed              to         test      this      modified         cell       through          the       hydrothermal    synthesis        of

goethite             from    2-­‐line            ferrihydrite.

Goethite             is          extremely       common         in         wet      and      oxidizing         surface            environments.                          It          can

form       as         a          weathering     product           of         Fe-­‐rich          minerals,         or        as         a    primary          precipitate      from    Fe-­rich           solutions         at         low      or        high     pH       (Cornell             and      Schwertmann,            2003).             The      high     sorption          capacity          of    goethite          can      control            the       mobility          of         trace    metals,            ions,    and      organic              compounds    (Gimenez        et         al.,        2007;              Tipping,          1981;              Torrent             et         al.,        1992).                         The      sorption          properties      of         goethite    can      vary     depending      on        multiple          factors,            such    as         particle           size      and         crystallinity.                Therefore,      a          detailed           understanding           of         the       relationship      among             the       kinetics           of         goethite          formation,      crystallite        size,        and      atomic             structure        is          needed            in         order              to         fully     understand       how     goethite          affects             trace    element           migration        on        the       Earth’s    surface            (Shaw              et         al.,        2005).                         Goethite          is          used    industrially        as         a          yellow             pigment          (Cornell          and

Schwertmann,               2003).                         Additionally    goethite          is          produced        as         an    intermediate              in         many               iron     oxide    preparations,             and      a          quantification    of         the       kinetics           and      activation        energies          associated      with     goethite             formation       is          industrially     useful              (Sharrock       and      Bodnar,           1985)

and         (Sesigur          et         al.,        1996).

Goethite             crystallization            has      been    the       subject            of         numerous       studies               (Schwertmann

and         Murad,            1983;              Nagano           et         al.,        1994;              and      Shaw    et         al.,    2005).                         However,        only     Shaw    et         al.         (2005)            investigated    hydrothermal    goethite          crystallization            in         real      time.                They    employed       EDPD     in         the       hydrothermal            autoclave        developed      by        Evans              et         al.    (1994).                       Although         they     succeeded      in         obtaining        rate     constants        and         activation        energies          for       goethite          crystallization            under              different    solution          conditions      (pH      10.7     and      13.7),               their    data     did       not       offer    sufficient           resolution       to         determine       full       structure        refinements    as         a          function             of         time     and      temperature.                          In         the       present           study,    I           used    my       modified         Norby             cell       to         perform          a          time-­‐resolved    study               of         goethite          crystallization            at         80,       90,       and      100      °C         in    aqueous          solutions         at         pH       at         13.6.                These              results             then     allowed              a          calculation      of         the       rate     constants        and      activation        energies    of         goethite          crystallization            with     high     accuracy.                    Because          hematite    and      goethite          are       both    found              naturally         on        the       Earth’s            surface,    even    though            hematite         is          considered     the       stable              phase              in         most       environments,            it          was      important       to         calculate         activation        energy    to         better              understand    why     both    minerals         are       present.                      This     study      will      show    that      the       activation        energy            for       goethite          is          significantly       lower              than     hematite         for       certain            environments,            leading    us        to         believe            the       goethite-­‐hematite    relationship    is          kinetically       driven    instead            of         thermodynamically               driven.

 

 

 

 

Figure    1.         Sample            stages              developed      by        Barnes            et         al.         (1991)    at         Station            9.7       of         the

Daresbury         Synchrotron    Radiation        Source            (SRS).              A)        Flat      plate    in         reflection;          B)        Thin    plate    in         transmission;             C)         Reaction         Tube    in         Transmission.               Source:           Barnes            et         al.         (1991)

 

 

 

Figure    2.                     A          schematic       representation           of         the       hydrothermal            autoclave           developed      by        Evans              et         al.         (1994).                        Source:           Evans     et         al.         (1994)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dimensional      representation           of         XRD     patterns          collected         by        ADPD              of    the       crystallization            of         goethite          from    2-­‐line            ferrihydrite.                Note    the    difference       in         the       number           of         peaks              visible             between          the       two         figures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure    4.         A          schematic       of         the       high     pressure         X-­‐ray             diffraction      cell    developed      by        Notten             et         al.         (1994).                        Be        window           allowed    X-­‐rays           to         penetrate        into      the       cell.                  Source:           Notten             et         al.    (1994).

 

 

 

 

Figure    5.         Close    up        view    of         the       cell       developed      by        Norby             et         al.    (1996).                        A)        T-­‐piece;        B)

Capillary;           C)         Tubing            applied            pressure         or        gas-­‐flow;      D)        Goniometer       head.    Source:           Norby             et         al.         (1996)

 

 

Figure    6.         Full      schematic       of         Norby             cell       showing          the       pressure         application        components.              Source:           Norby             et         al.         (1996)

A  TIME-­RESOLVED SYNCHROTRON X-­RAY  DIFFRACTION STUDY OF  THE IN SITU, HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS OF GOETHITE FROM 2-­‐LINE FERRIHYDRITE

Leave a Reply